19/03/2018

A new work of art is unveiled at EuroAirport: “Les dessous du ciel ou l’attrape-nuages” by Jean-Paul Philippe

Monday, 19 March 2018 - At an official ceremony in the presence of representatives from the Saint Louis Agglomeration, Board members of the Foundation Fernet Branca, the sculptor Jean-Paul Philippe and representatives of the Jeanne Bucher Jaeger art gallery, Jean-Pierre Lavielle, President of the Board of Directors of EuroAirport, Matthias Suhr, Director, Werner Parini, Head of the Airport Terminal Department and Vivienne Gaskell, Head of Communications, unveiled the new work of art, entitled “Les dessous du ciel ou l’attrape-nuages” by French sculptor Jean-Paul Philippe. The new work of art is located in front of the airport building, at Arrivals on the French side.

As a powerful symbol of the link between the sky and the earth, this new work of art blends in perfectly with the airport environment. Composed of a nearly 16 square metre mirror and 10 metre-high ladder, it offers passers-by and passengers a foretaste of travel in the skies before they even step into the airport building. The artwork thus highlights the airport's mission as a travel hub linking air and land transport with its diversified offering of regular flight connections between earth and the sky.

In acquiring this work of art EuroAirport also underscores the attractiveness and originality of its site. The new artwork is a worthy addition to EuroAirport’s existing art collection: the “Luminator”, the last work of Jean Tinguely, unveiled in September 2011, on the 5th floor of the airport building, on the Swiss side and “Les valises” by Jean-Marc Gaillard, installed in  2011 on the airport forecourt, at Arrivals on the Swiss side.

The work of art “Les dessous du ciel ou l’attrape-nuages” by French sculptor Jean-Paul Philippe was created specially for the Archéologies intérieures retrospective of the artist’s oeuvre dedicated to the artist by the Foundation Fernet-Branca of Saint Louis in 2011.

This original work, referencing neither a movement nor school of thought or system, between sky and earth, is an inner archaeology revealing only traces of past encounters and journeys. So what better a place than the public forecourt of EuroAirport, on the French side, for this evocative symbol to engage visitors as they approach the airport building which links airspace with the earth.